Nov 17, 2011

Training in Complex Trauma for Value Behavioral Health Providers

I'm in Pittsburgh now, November 17, 2011. I'll be doing a presentation for Value Behavioral Health about evaluating and treatment Complex Trauma tomorrow. VBH manages the Medicaid contract for the State of PA for Western PA, so there will be about 350 providers at the training.

Nov 12, 2011

Attachment Therapy Companion

I've just heard that a book I wrote with two colleagues,
The Attachment Therapy Companion: Key Practices for Treating Children
& Families
is now in production and should be out in early 2012. The book
describes what are the standards of care for this treatment.
From the Introduction:

This book is an important contribution to the field of trauma
treatment and attachment-focused the therapy. It provides the
clinician with a framework to assess, develop treatment plans, and
provide treatment in a comprehensive and integrated manner. College
professors are afforded a guide for classroom instruction. The book
will provide consumers with the necessary tools and information to
make better informed decisions regarding the adequacy of care they are
getting. College professors will find this book a useful adjunct for
family therapy, treatment, and ethics classes and the study guide will
assist in classroom instruction. Finally the book will provide judges,
child welfare professionals, insurance companies, and others with a
framework for evaluating proposed plans of care. It is my belief that
this book will mark a new stage in the development of attachment-
focused therapy by delineating what are the standards of care for the
treatment of attachment and trauma disorders.

Oct 23, 2011

Tips for parents

Tips for parents on Halloween safety:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/mary-l-pulido-phd/protecting-kids-first-a-s_b_991354.html

New Book on the Practice of Attachment-Focused Therapy

Dr. Becker-Weidman is one of the editors of a new book to be published early in 2012 on the professional practice of attachment-focused therapy. The two other editors are Lois Ehrmann and Denise LeBow. The book will serve as a practice manual defining standards of care. The book will be a valuable resource for social workers, psychologists, mental health practitioners, departments of social services, child welfare organizations, judges, and attorneys. The book's table of contents will be:
Chapter 1: Terminology and Diagnosis
Chapter 2: Purposes and Scope of Guide
Chapter 3: Overview of Attachment Theory: Synopsis of Key Concepts
CHAPTER 4: Overview of Attachment-Focused Therapy
CHAPTER 5: Core Concepts of Trauma and Trauma Focused Therapy
CHAPTER 6: Intake, Screening, & Referral
CHAPTER 7: Assessment of Children With Attachment Issues
CHAPTER 8: Treatment Planning
CHAPTER 9: Considerations in Behavior Management
CHAPTER 10: Training, Consultation, and Competency
CHAPTER 11: Ethical Considerations in Attachment Focused Therapy
CHAPTER 12: Vicarious Trauma and the Clinician’s Responsibility for Self Care
References
Glossary
Appendix A: Paper on Coercion in Treatment
Appendix B: Screening and Assessment Tools
Appendix C: Out-of Home Placements
Appendix D: Study Guide

Sep 25, 2011

Dr. Becker-Weidman to present two days in Northern California

Dr. Becker-Weidman will be presenting a workshop, "Healing Trauma and Attachment Disorders" at two locations in Northern California Oct 14 & 15.

Dr. Becker-Weidman in Saratoga Springs

Dr. Becker-Weidman will be presenting a community workshop, "Complex Trauma: A Community Approach"- Implications for Treatment, Parenting, Child Welfare, Family Court and Education"
in Saratoga Springs on October 20, 2011.

Dr. Becker-Weidman @ Justice For Children in Syracuse

Dr. Becker-Weidman will be presenting at the 2011 Building Justice for Children Conference in Syracuse October 25-27. He will be talking about Assessing Children's mental health and trauma issues.

Sep 12, 2011

What is Attachment?

The attachment system, is a biologically based system that evolved to ensure the survival of the human infant. In simple terms, it is a proximity seeking system. When a child is threatened, the child will seek its primary caregiver who provides a sense of safety and security.

The organization ATTACh (Association for the Treatment and Training of Attachment in Children) gives the following lengthier definition of attachment:
“Attachment is a reciprocal process by which an emotional connection develops between an infant and his/her primary caregiver. It influences the child’s physical, neurological, cognitive, and psychological development. It becomes the basis for development of basic trust or mistrust, and shapes how the child will relate to the world, learn, and form relationships throughout life.”

Sep 9, 2011

Complex Trauma: A community Approach

Dr. Becker-Weidman will be presenting two day-long workshops in California:


Arthur Becker -Weidman, Ph.D.
Friday, October 14, 2011
9:00 AM—4:00 PM
Chi co Masonic Fami ly Cente r
1110 W. East Avenue , Chi co CA
Please RSVP to (530) 879-3861 or ldamschroder@sierraff.org
This FREE training is made available through the collaborative efforts of
Sierra Forever Families & California Department of Social Services
Childcare Reimbursement Available call Leslie 879-3861 for more information
Arthur Becker-Weidman, Ph.D. is a Diplomat in Child Psychology and Forensic Psychology, the American Board of Psychological Specialties. He is a Registered Clinician with the Association for the Treatment and Training in the Attachment of Children and is a Certified Therapist, Consultant, and Trainer of Dyadic Developmental treatment®. Dr.
Becker-Weidman has edited and authored four books: Creating Capacity for Attachment (2005/2008), Attachment Parenting (2010), Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy: Essential Practices & Methods (2010), and The Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy Casebook (2011). He has four DVD's. Dr. Becker-Weidman is on the Board of Directors of the Association for the Treatment and Training in the Attachment of Children where he serves on several committees. Dr. Becker-Weidman provides training and workshops to parents, professionals, and governments across the U.S. and internationally.
These learning objectives will be addressed:
Participants will be able to describe how parent-child attachment normally develops
Participants will identify the seven domains of impairment caused by Complex Trauma
Participants will be able to identify three general principles of parenting & treatment grounded in attachment-theory & Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy
Participants will be able to use two new interventions to help parents with children with trauma and attachment disorders
Participants will be able to describe one key element of Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy and be able to use it in their practice
Parents will be be able to describe the fundamental principles of attachment-facilitating parenting.
Parents will be able to implement at least two attachment facilitating interventions
Course meets qualifications for 6 hours continuing
education credit for MFT’s & LCSW’s as required by the Board of Behavioral Sciences

Complex Trauma: A community Approach

Dr. Becker-Weidman will be presenting an all day workshop on October 20, 2011 in Saratoga Springs.

“Complex Trauma: A Community Approach”- Implications for Treatment, Parenting, Child Welfare, Family Court and Education.”

With Dr. Arthur Becker-Weidman

October 20, 2011

8:30- 5 pm.

8:00am Registration

Knights of Columbus Hall
50 Pine Road
Saratoga Springs, New York

CONFERENCE FEE
PROFESSIONALS: $95.00
All purchase orders add $15.00
PARENTS & GUARDIANS: $25.00
Due to Co-Sponsorship by the Theraplay Institute 6 CEUs are available for psychologists and play therapists

Coffee & Lunch Included

MAKE YOUR CHECK PAYABLE TO:
CCMH YOUTH CONFERENCE

MAIL TO:
Tammy Horan
Saratoga County Mental Health Center
211 Church Street
Saratoga Springs, NY 12866
518-584-9030
e-mail: ythserv@yahoo.com

Name:___________________________

Agency:__________________________

Address:_________________________

________________________________

Phone:___________________________

E-Mail:__________________________

Children in the Child Welfare system have often experienced Complex Trauma and require specialized treatment, parenting and educational approaches. For over twenty-five years Dr. Becker Weidman has specialized in the treatment of families with children who have complex trauma and disorders of attachment and on training therapists, parents, children welfare workers, educators and courts
Dr. Becker- Weidman will describe Complex Trauma and Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy (DDP), which is an evidence-based, effective, and empirically validated treatment, and how these approaches and concepts can integrate the community response system. Dr. Becker-Weidman will explain the effects of complex trauma on child development as well as factors affecting placement stability. The ways that teachers, child welfare professionals, parents, and therapists respond are often the key to lessening the ill effects of trauma. The community system of care must embody the principles of safety, security, support, acceptance, curiosity so that the child and family can heal. Through the use of presentations and tapes of actual sessions, Dr. Becker-Weidman will explain his approach.

Children in the Child Welfare system have often experienced Complex trauma and require specialized treatment, parenting and educational approaches. For over twenty-five years Dr. Becker Weidman has specialized in the treatment of families with children who have complex trauma and disorders of attachment and on training therapists, parents, children welfare workers, educators and courts. The material presented by Dr. Becker-Weidman will build on the presentation of Dr. Daniel Hughes her in 2009. Dr. Becker-Weidman and Dr. Hughes are close colleagues, haven written articles together and collaborate as trainers and Board members of the Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy Institute.
Dr. Becker- Weidman will describe Complex Trauma and dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy, which is an evidence-based, effective, and empirically validated treatment,how these approaches and concepts can integrate the systems of care that are involved with foster and adoptive families and their children, as well as will children with histories of abuse and neglect and attachment disorganization. Dr. Becker-Weidman will explain what Complex Trauma is, its effects on child development, factors affecting placement stability and the implications of this for teachers, child welfare professionals, parents, and therapists. The framework for this presentation will be Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy, an approach grounded in Attachment Theory. Dr. Becker-Weidman’s approach within all systems of care is to provide safety, security and the necessary support so that the positive and emotionally meaningful relationships can develop. He actively communicates acceptance, curiosity and empathy. The system of care must embody these principles so that the child and family can heal. Through the use of presentations and tapes of actual sessions, Dr. Becker-Weidman will explain his approach.

About the Presenter
Dr. Arthur Becker-Weidman has been training professionals, evaluating and treating families and children with trauma-attachment disorders for over thirty years. He has a PhD from the University of Maryland’s Institute for Child Study and is a Diplomat of the American Board of Psychological Specialties in Child Psychology and Forensic Psychology. He is recognized as an expert witness and frequently provides testimony in court proceedings.
Art lives in Williamsville, NY with his family and is the Director of The Center for Family Development, an internationally recognized training and treatment center. He is the author of four books: Creating Capacity for Attachment (2005/2008), Attachment Facilitating Parenting (2010), Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy Casebook (2011). He is the author of many articles in professional peer-reviewed journals and empirical studies. He has published research demonstrating the efficacy and evidence-base of DDP. Dr. Becker-Weidman provides training and consultation to therapists, psychologists, social workers, and parents throughout the US, Australia, Canada, Finland, Singapore, Slovakia and the Czech Republic.

Who Should Attend?
This program is designed for anyone who would like to know how to work together across disciplines with children and families who have suffered from the effects of Complex Trauma. The conference is directed toward child-centered professionals and community systems that work to help to lessen those effects. This training will provide a perceptual framework to understand what these children and families need as well as readily implementable ideas that can be used at home, school, community, as well as in therapeutic, child welfare, and family court offices.
• Psychologists and Psychiatrists
• Social Workers/Therapists
• Family Therapists
• Play Therapists
• Parents and Caretakers
• Residential Counselors
• Teachers/School Professionals
• Adoption/Post-adoption Caseworkers
• Child Welfare Workers
• Family Court Judges
• Early Childhood Development Specialists
• Teachers/School Professionals
• Adoption/Post-adoption Caseworkers
• Child Welfare Workers
• Family Court Judges
• Early Childhood Development Specialists

Program Schedule
Introduction/Overview of Day-8:30-8:45
Complex Trauma………………..8:45-11:00
1) What is Complex Trauma?
2) 7 Domains of Impairment
3) Effects on Child Development and Behavior
4) DVD: A child’s View
BREAK……………………………..10:30-10:45
Factors affecting placement stability & Breakdown………………………11:00-11:30
Principles of effective interventions-11:30-12:00
LUNCH……………………………..12:00-1:00
Implications for Parents, Teachers, Clinicians, Child Welfare and Family Court …………………..…………………..1:00-5:00
Teachers……………………… ….1:00-2:00
Class and School Practices
Child Welfare and Family Court-2:00-3:00
Placement Policies/Court Issues
Foster Parent Selection & Training
BREAK………………………………..3:00-3:15
Treatment……………………………3:15-4:00
Elements of treatment Parenting
…………….………………………….4:00-5:00
Attachment Facilitating Parenting

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:
Tammy Horan
518-584-9030
conferenceythserv@yahoo.com
DIRECTIONS:
From I-87 take Exit 13N, merge onto US-9
toward Saratoga Springs
4.4m turn left onto Washington St. /NY 29
(Corner with Starbucks)
1.5 m turn left onto Pine Rd
Left into Parking Lot.
50 Pine Rd.
Knights of Columbus Hall

Sep 8, 2011

Healing Trauma & Attachment Disorders Workshop

Dr. Becker-Weidman will be presenting two day-long workshops in California:


Arthur Becker -Weidman, Ph.D.
Friday, October 14, 2011
9:00 AM—4:00 PM
Chi co Masonic Fami ly Cente r
1110 W. East Avenue , Chi co CA
Please RSVP to (530) 879-3861 or ldamschroder@sierraff.org
This FREE training is made available through the collaborative efforts of
Sierra Forever Families & California Department of Social Services
Childcare Reimbursement Available call Leslie 879-3861 for more information
Arthur Becker-Weidman, Ph.D. is a Diplomat in Child Psychology and Forensic Psychology, the American Board of Psychological Specialties. He is a Registered Clinician with the Association for the Treatment and Training in the Attachment of Children and is a Certified Therapist, Consultant, and Trainer of Dyadic Developmental treatment®. Dr.
Becker-Weidman has edited and authored four books: Creating Capacity for Attachment (2005/2008), Attachment Parenting (2010), Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy: Essential Practices & Methods (2010), and The Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy Casebook (2011). He has four DVD's. Dr. Becker-Weidman is on the Board of Directors of the Association for the Treatment and Training in the Attachment of Children where he serves on several committees. Dr. Becker-Weidman provides training and workshops to parents, professionals, and governments across the U.S. and internationally.
These learning objectives will be addressed:
Participants will be able to describe how parent-child attachment normally develops
Participants will identify the seven domains of impairment caused by Complex Trauma
Participants will be able to identify three general principles of parenting & treatment grounded in attachment-theory & Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy
Participants will be able to use two new interventions to help parents with children with trauma and attachment disorders
Participants will be able to describe one key element of Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy and be able to use it in their practice
Parents will be be able to describe the fundamental principles of attachment-facilitating parenting.
Parents will be able to implement at least two attachment facilitating interventions
Course meets qualifications for 6 hours continuing
education credit for MFT’s & LCSW’s as required by the Board of Behavioral Sciences

Justice for Children Conference

Dr. Becker-Weidman will be presenting a workshop at the Building Justice For Children 2011 Conference to be held in Syracuse NY on October 25-27, 2011. His workshop will be about Assessing Children for Trauma.

For more information, go to

http://www.center4familydevelop.com/workshops.htm

Jul 27, 2011

Mental Health issues of Adopted Children

The National Institutes of Health released a report this week stating “adopted children have higher rates of mental health problems than all other children.”

For those of us in the adoption world, the report — the 15th in a series issued since 1997 by the Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics – may state the obvious. But it is also throws a gauntlet at the feet of social service agencies and policy makers.

During the past twenty years, the adoption landscape has been radically transformed. From the secretive adoption of babies born to unwed and predominantly white mothers, the norm today is arranged, open adoption of newborns, children from foster care or children from institutions and orphanages in far flung parts of the world.

Recent statistics help put this shift into perspective. Out of the approximately 135,000 children adopted in the U.S. last year, 11,000 (most between the ages of one and two) were internationally adopted. Here in the U.S. just over 52,000 children were adopted into non-family member homes from foster care.

Adam Pertman, Executive Director of the Evan B. Donaldson Adoption Institute, and author of Adoption Nation (Basic Books, Perseus Book Group, 2000) said in an interview that, “many adopted kids today enter their new families with pre-adoption lives. For them, this means they’ve experienced abuse, neglect, or [if from an inter-country placement] institutionalization.”

Older parents who can’t have their own children are a key factor driving the demand for more international and foster care adoptions. Not only are these new adoptive families not genetically linked, many parents, like myself, don’t even know the genetic history of the children we end up calling our own.

The upside to this expanded adoption domain has been a tremendous surge in diversity. Parents don’t try and adopt children that look like them nor do they demand infants. The linear homogenous family model is out and the crazy quilt is in. The downside, though, is inadequate support to help parents understand the history of their child or to help prepare these families for potential difficulties, both behavioral and cognitive. In their giddy rush to form a family, na├»ve parents can be blindsided when confronted by the reality of their adopted child’s extreme needs. To help theses parents cope, an industry of medical, cultural and emotional support services have emerged.

Nothing could underscore the point more clearly than the return in April 2010 of adoptee Artyom Savalyev to his native Russia. His single mother, Torry Hansen, allegedly overwhelmed by seven-year old Atryom’s unpredictable and unstable behavior, determined she could no longer parent him. Instead, Hansen sent her son back on a plane to Russia, by himself, with a note pinned inside his jacket. Artyom remains in Russia at an undisclosed location while the case against Hansen languishes in limbo.

Dr. Lisa Albers Prock, a Developmental Behavioral Pediatrician at Children’s Hospital Boston, and a leading advocate of ‘adoption medicine,’ says she tries to prepare parents for what to expect, but it’s hard, she says, for anxious new parents to grasp the complexities of “kids that have been fully programmed and have to be reprogrammed” in a new setting.

The new NIH report highlights some of the realities on the ground. Of the families surveyed, almost 30 percent of adopted children had moderate to severe health problems and foster care children were the most susceptible. In addition to health problems, many of these children also had an assortment of cognitive deficits such as learning disabilities, ADD and ADHD, or behavior and conduct disorders. Exposure to alcohol or drugs during pregnancy is often thought to be the culprit behind these deficits, as is infant trauma, which can have serious and long-lasting implications later in life.

While this data is distressing, Pertman says reports like this are “helpful and a good wake-up call.” To Pertman, these findings demand that policy makers take notice. The once mandatory emphasis on placement should now shift, he says, “to looking at how to help these kids and families succeed.” The NIH findings also coincide with his Institute’s most recent policy and practice report on the need for post-adoption services.

The NIH report demonstrates families feel challenged. But instead of retreating or giving up, these parents are demanding help. Despite the old Beatles refrain, “Love is all you need,” sometimes you also need a safety net.

Jul 22, 2011

ATTACh seeks Executive Director

ATTACh, the Association for Treatment and Training in the Attachment of Children, an international coalition of professionals and families dedicated to helping those with attachment difficulties by sharing our knowledge, talents and resources is seeking a dynamic leader to serve as it's Executive Director. Our vision is to be an international leader in creating public awareness and education regarding attachment and the critical role it plays in human development. We provide an annual conference, educational programs, advocacy, community building, a membership directory, and other benefits to our members and the public. We are seeking an experienced professional to work in a collaborative community environment, building relationships and serving as a leader of a diverse team of professionals and parents. Experience in community organization, fundraising, business development ,budget planning, administration, and personnel management is required. Knowledge of information systems, research and legal issues is highly desirable. Experience in attachment, trauma, or related fields is strongly preferred. This position requires strong analytical, creative thinking and problem-solving abilities. A balance of assertiveness and diplomacy is critical, as well as effective listening skills and excellent verbal and written communications skills. Experience with MS Office (Word, Excel and Access) is essential.

Master's Degree in Human Services, Business, Social Services or related degree is required, with a minimum of five years of progressively responsible combined experience in first line and/or second line management/administration of a non-profit organization.

Geographic location of position within USA is negotiable. Please send cover letter, salary requirements and resume to search committee at email listed above.


Compensation: salary negotiable
Telecommuting is ok.
This is at a non-profit organization.
Principals only. Recruiters, please don't contact this job poster.
Please, no phone calls about this job!
Please do not contact job poster about other services, products or commercial interests.


The email for this is Dynamicleaderforattach@gmail.com.

Jul 14, 2011

Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy: Video on Attachment Focused Therapy

The Association for the Treatment and Training in the Attachment of Children has a wonderful new video about Attachment Focused Therapy. You can view it here. This video is a must see for parents and professionals. It describes the latest information on evidence-based, effective, and empirically validated treatments for Complex Trauma, Reactive Attachment Disorder, and other disorders of attachment. The speakers and presenters are internationally recognized experts in the evaluation and treatment of these conditions.

See the video here.

Jul 13, 2011

Exciting new video by ATTACh

The Association for the Treatment and Training in the Attachment of Children, had an exciting video about the diagnosis and treatment of attachment disorders. This organization's highly respected and followed publications, such as the Therapeutic Practice Manual and Parent Manual are now enhanced by this video.

The video presents the most up to date material for parents and professionals regarding the diagnosis and treatment of disorders of attachment and has such highly internationally respected professionals on it as Dr. Michael Trout and Dr. Richard Kagan.

Go to the video here.

Jun 9, 2011

Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy Identified as an Effective Treatment by UK Institute

IN an exciting development, the Institute for Research and Innovation in Social Services, recognizes Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy as an evidence-based, effective, and empirically validated treatment. The Institute is a large, internationally regarded institute whose function is to promote positive outcomes in the social service field by identifying evidence informed practice and disseminating research, innovations, and improvements in social services policy, practice, and programming.

The Institutes most recent report, "Insights: Attachment-Informed practice with looked after children and young people, had the following key points:

Attachment behaviour ensures the survival of infants and young children by keeping their caregivers close and available to provide protection and comfort. The attachment relationship provides the context for the main developmental tasks of infancy and early childhood, particularly emotional regulation and the development of the capacity to ‘mentalise’.

The characteristics of caregivers affect the organisation and security of children’s attachment relationships with them. Sensitive, responsive parenting and parental ability to reflect on the infant’s own thoughts and feelings are associated with secure attachments in children.

Children who have experienced maltreatment are significantly more likely to develop disorganised
attachments and these can have lifelong physical, emotional and social consequences.

Recent evidence from neuroscience confirms the importance of the early emotional and social experience of
infants for the healthy development of their brains. Maltreatment can disturb the patterns of cortisol
(stress hormone) secretion which can affect immediate and long term mental and physical health.

Looked after children benefit from developing secure attachments with their caregivers and interventions
should support the development of these, whether children remain at home or are cared for outside their family.

Successful placements are more likely when carers are able to respond to children at their emotional age
rather than their chronological one. Interventions with children should aim to address developmental brain
impairment by providing care that can build fundamental brain capacities. For looked after children this will mean less use of verbal techniques and a greater concentration on physical, sensory and emotional ways of working.

Caregivers should be assessed on their capacity to tolerate difficult behaviour and remain sensitive and
responsive to the needs of children.

Support and training should be provided to caregivers on a frequent and regular basis to ensure that they are able to maintain their capacity to be reflective about children rather than reactive to their behaviour.

Attachment-informed practice may require a policy and culture shift to ensure that children’s needs
are appropriately met when they are cared for away from home.

As you can see their key point that carers should respond to children based on their emotional age rather than their chronological age is supported by our study revealing that children with Complex Trauma and disorders of attachment are substantially younger developmentally than their chronological age:
Becker-Weidman, A., (2009) “Effects of Early Maltreatment on Development: A Descriptive study using the Vineland,” Child Welfare, 88 (2)137-161.

The Institue's paper goes on to state it's support for Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy as an evidence-informed and validated treatment approach:
Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy is an attachment-focused approach in which a therapist supports the caregiver and child’s relationship and the development of secure attachment by encouraging the reflective function of the caregiver, enabling attunement, regulating emotion and co creating meaning. The therapist
interactions are characterised by PACE (playfulness, acceptance, curiosity and empathy) and similar qualities are supported in the caregiver with the addition of love (PLACE). This approach has been well evaluated with foster carers and adoptive parents and recently elements of this model have been successfully introduced within residential child care (Becker-Weidman and Hughes, 2008).

Becker-Weidman, A., & Hughes, D., (2008) “Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy: An evidence-based treatment for children with complex trauma and disorders of attachment,” Child & Adolescent Social Work, 13, pp.329-337

May 27, 2011

Reactive Attachment Disorder: For Educators

The following is a handout that a colleague produced for Educators. You may find this valuable.

A few references that may also be helpful:

Becker-Weidman, A., 2010, Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy: Essential Practices & Methods, Lanham, MD: Jason Aronson.
Becker-Weidman, A., & Shell, D., 2010, Attachment Parenting, Lanham, MD: Jason Aronson.
Becker-Weidman, A., & Shell, D., 3rd printing, 2011: Creating Capacity for Attachment.
Becker-Weidman, A., 2006, Principles of Attachment Parenting, DVD, order from Amazon.com


FACT SHEET FOR EDUCATORS
by
Connie Hornyak, LCSW
chlcsw@pacbell.net

Children with disorders of attachment are the victims of abuse, neglect, abandonment, physical illness, multiple placements and/or in-utero drug/alcohol exposure. Their problems are rooted in the first five years of their lives, when trauma occurred. Stable attachments cannot be formed when a child experiences frequent changes in daycare or foster care, or when the child’s social, emotional, physical, and cognitive needs are unmet.

While many children with disorders of attachment have grown up in foster care and/or adoptive homes, these disorders occur in children who are growing up with their biological parents as well. It is estimated that one-third of elementary school children in the United States have some form of an attachment issue, if not the full blown disorder, due to divorce, inappropriate daycare programs, and multiple caregivers. Children who have experienced medical events such as hospitalization, placement in an incubator or a body cast can also develop these disorders.

According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, published by the American Psychiatric Association, there are two types of Reactive Attachment Disorder. In the Inhibited Type the child persistently fails to initiate and to respond to most social interactions in a developmentally appropriate way. The child shows a pattern of excessively inhibited, hyper vigilant or highly ambivalent responses (for example, frozen watchfulness, resistance to comfort, or mixture of approach and avoidance). In the Disinhibited Type, there is a pattern of diffused attachments. The child exhibits indiscriminate sociability or a lack of selectivity in the choice of attachment figures. For example, the child may be extremely charming and friendly with those who are not trying to be his or her parents, while acting violently toward parents who are attempting to become emotionally close to the child.

What is a Disorder of Attachment?

A person with a disorder of attachment has difficulty forming loving, lasting, intimate relationships. These individuals are unable to be genuinely affectionate with others, have not experienced conscience development, and cannot trust others. Attachment is necessary for the development of an emotionally healthy person who has conscience development, experiences empathy, attains full intellectual potential, thinks logically, copes with stress and frustration, becomes self reliant, develops healthy personal and business relationships, and handles the ups and downs of everyday life. Attachment Disorder is Helen Keller.



Children with disorders of attachment do not respect authority, especially that of their parents. They are sometimes oppositional and defiant in the school setting, although many of these children behave perfectly with those who are not parenting them. It is not uncommon for a child with a disorder of attachment to be a good student as well as the most helpful child in the class. The same child may go home and threaten his mother with a knife, set fires, and/or kill animals. Children with attachment disorder have been so damaged that they cannot trust. Their behavior meets their subconscious need to keep those who love them most at a distance. They are fearful that, if they become emotionally close to their parents, they will somehow be hurt again as they were in the past. These children are terrified of closeness, and will do anything they can to create distance between themselves and their parents. One way this is manifested is in children’s ability to triangulate; that is, to pit one adult against the other. Children with disorders of attachment frequently lie to their teachers, accusing their parents of emotional abuse, physical abuse or neglect, and lie so convincingly that their teachers believe them. Many parents have been erroneously reported for suspected child abuse when school personnel have listened to the child without checking the facts with the parent.

What’s a teacher to do?

• Develop and maintain constant communication with the child’s parents. This will greatly increase the chance of all adults being consistent in the child’s life at home and at school. Be sure to check with parents if you suspect that the child’s story could be untrue. Ask parents to do the same for you. For example, if the child comes home and says that his teacher hit him, yelled at him or otherwise behaved inappropriately, please ask the parents to check out the child’s story with you before acting upon it.
• Children with attachment disorders need a tight, loving, structured environment where the rules never change but the consequences often do.
• These children need a tightly structured environment in order to feel safe. They do not need an overly permissive environment which makes them feel unsafe. Please respect the need of the parents to be the primary attachment figures in this child’s life. While many teachers, especially in younger grades, tend to hug children and openly display affection for them, this type of treatment is inappropriate for a child with a disorder of attachment. If this type of treatment is given in the school setting, the child will simply triangulate, manipulating the teacher into thinking that he or she is an important attachment figure in a child’s life, and using the teacher’s affection to manipulate the parents at home.
• Follow through on any and all consequences. The child’s safety and that of others depends on it.
• Hold the child responsible for his or her actions. Understand that, until the child’s behavior becomes more positive, he or she will have an extremely depressing life. Even though the child has problems and may have a painful past, it is important to hold the child responsible for his or her actions and not excuse those actions because of the child’s previous trauma.
• Remember that these children are superficially charming with strangers and others who are not their parents. These children lack the ability to have true closeness with their parents and other family members.
• Please understand that if this child criticizes his parents and asks to go home with you, this is a means of distancing from closeness with the parents. The child is fearful of closeness with parents because previous parents have left the child or traumatized him/her.
• Children with disorders of attachment need to regress and experience being infants and toddlers, as well as young children, before they can behave in an age-appropriate fashion. Please realize that there are days when the child may need to stay home from school in order to receive therapy, or because the child simply needs to be close to his or her parents. Once attachment issues are resolved, the child will have plenty of energy to make up for lost time at school.







For more information about disorders of attachment, please access the following web sites: www.icfd.net and www.attach.org.










4/26/11

Apr 15, 2011

Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy Training in 2012

ABOUT THE WORKSHOP
The workshop covers all the "Required Core Training Content" necessary to enter the practicum to become a Certified Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy therapist. The use of SKYPE, independent study, and consultations will allow remote participants to fulfill the requirements to become Certified Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy therapists.

The workshop uses a combination of SKYPE sessions, group discussion, independent study, and case presentations. Attachment-focused family therapy workbook, is the course text.

Early deprivation, neglect, abuse, significant early health problems and hospitalizations, repeated moves, or more than one year in an orphanage can create attachment problems that require specialized treatment. Traditional forms of therapy are ineffective with attachment-disordered children. This workshop will provide the therapist and other professionals with an opportunity to learn and practice effective treatment methods for trauma-attachment disordered children.

Participants are encouraged to present videotapes of sessions.

Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy is an evidence-based, effective, and empirically validated treatment that is grounded in current thinking and research on the etiology and treatment of Complex Trauma or Developmental Trauma Disorder and disorders of attachment. Treatment is primarily experiential and there is an important teaching element as well. Teaching parents about attachment-facilitating parenting methods and the importance of attunement and responsive, sensitive parenting is essential. Direct work with the parents regarding their own family or origin issues is another component of treatment. Finally, intensive emotional work with the child in a manner consistent with sound treatment principles is vital.

The workshop is led by Dr. Arthur Becker-Weidman, who is a certified Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapist, Certified Consultant, and Certified Trainer by the Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy Institute.

CENTER FOR FAMILY DEVELOPMENT
The Center For Family Development is an internationally recognized treatment and training center specializing in helping adopted and foster families with trauma and attachment disordered children. The Center is a registered agency with the Association for Treatment and Training in the Attachment of Children.


Arthur Becker-Weidman, CSW-R Ph.D. received his doctorate in Human Development from the University of Maryland, Institute for Child Study. He achieved Diplomate status from the American Board of Psychological Specialties in Child Psychology and Forensic Psychology. He is a Vice-President, clinical, with the Association for the Treatment and Training in the Attachment of Children and President of the Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy Institute. Art is an adjunct Clinical Professor at SUNY at Buffalo. He has published over a dozen scholarly papers and regularly presents at international and national conferences. Art consults with psychologists, social workers, marriage and family therapists and several child treatment agencies, school districts, departments of social services, and governments in the United States, Canada, Finland, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Singapore, & Australia.

EVIDENCE-BASIS FOR TREATMENT
* Becker-Weidman, A., (2006) “Treatment for Children with Trauma-Attachment Disorders: Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy,” Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal. Vol. 23(2), 147-171.
* Becker-Weidman, A., (2006) “Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy: A multi-year Follow-up,” in, New Developments In Child Abuse Research, Stanley M. Sturt, Ph.D. (Ed.) Nova Science Publishers, NY, pp. 43 – 61.
* Becker-Weidman, A., (2007). “Treatment For Children with Reactive Attachment Disorder: Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy,” http://www.center4familydevelop.com/research.pdf
* Becker-Weidman, A., & Hughes, D., (2008) “Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy: An evidence-based treatment for children with complex trauma and disorders of attachment,” Child & Adolescent Social Work, 13, pp.329-337.
* Craven, P., & Lee, R., (2006) Therapeutic Interventions for Foster Children: A Systematic Research Synthesis, Research on Social Work Practice, 16(3):287-304.


TRAINING OUTLINE
2012
Center For Family Development
5820 Main Street, suite 406
Williamsville, NY 14221

SCHEDULE
A Six-month 56-hour Master Class.
10:00 am– 5:00 pm, 1/20/12, 2/17, 3.16, 4/20, 5/18, 6/21. Dates subject to change based on participant requests, 2012 holidays, and group agreement. Limited to eight.

OUTLINE
* Patterns of attachment
* Engaging and working with parents
* Intersubjectivity & use of self in practice
* Experiential components of training
* Components of Practice
* Phases of Treatment
* Differential use of components of
* Practice in different phases of
treatment
* Treatment with different populations and
circumstances
* Experiential components of training
* Consultation

Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy is an evidence-based, effective, and empirically validated treatment. Two follow-up studies with control groups found clinically and statistically significant reductions in symptoms of attachment disorder, aggression, anti-social behavior, thought disorders, attention problems, mood, and social relationship dysfunction. Over 80% of the children treated had previously been in treatment on three or more occasions, without any noticeable improvement. Treatment averaged 23 sessions over approximately ten months. (Arthur Becker-Weidman, Ph.D., Child & Adolescent Social Work, vol. 23, pp.137-171, 2006)
SUGGESTED READING
You will find the following list of books helpful. It is strongly recommended that you read the first book before the workshop begins. This will ensure that everyone has a solid foundation of common knowledge.

1. Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy: Essential Methods & Practices, Arthur Becker-Weidman, Ph.D., Rowman, Lanham, MD, 2010.
2. The Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy Casebook, Arthur Becker-Weidman, Rowman: Lanham, MD, 2011.
3. Creating Capacity for Attachment, Eds., Arthur Becker-Weidman, Ph.D., Deborah Shell, MA, LCMHC, Wood ‘N’ Barnes, 2005/2008.
4. Attachment Parenting, Ed., Arthur Becker-Weidman & Deborah Shell, Rowman: Lanham, MD, 2010.
5. Attachment-Focused Family Therapy. Daniel Hughes, Norton, 2007.
6. Attachment-Focused Family Therapy Workbook, D. Hughes, Norton: NY, 2011.
7. Handbook of Attachment: Theory, Research, and Clinical Applications. Edited by Jude Cassidy and Phillip Shaver. The Guilford Press, 2008.
8. Building the Bonds of Attachment. 2nd. Ed. Daniel Hughes, Ph.D., 2006
9. Attachment Across the Life Cycle. Edited by Colin Murray Parkes, Joan Stevenson-Hinde, and Peter Marris. Routledge, 1991.
10. A Secure Base. John Bowlby, Basic Books, NY, 1988.
11. John Bowlby & Attachment Theory. Jeremy Holmes, Routledge, NY, 1993.

PURPOSE OF WORKSHOP
This workshop is for therapists who want to learn how to treat trauma-attachment disordered children. Participants will learn effective therapy principals for helping traumatized children. Participants will learn:
1. Initial work to determine parent readiness.
2. The components of Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy and the phases of treatment.
3. The differential use of components in different phases of treatment.
4. Effective therapeutic techniques to use with traumatized and attachment disordered children and their families.
5. Effective parenting principals.
Participants will have the opportunity to view videotapes of actual therapy sessions with traumatized children that demonstrate therapeutic principals and present their own video tapes or cases.

Mar 28, 2011

Emotional neglect can be defined as 'emotional unresponsiveness, unavailability and neglect characterised by a lack of interaction between parent and child.' It has been linked to children developing more mental-health problems but most research so far has been based on adults' memories of their childhood not how children feel at the time. A team of researchers from the University of Glasgow and the Medical Research Council in Glasgow studied 1,694 children. The children filled out a questionnaire called the Parental Bonding Instrument at 11 to assess their relationship with their parents and then had a computerhttp://www.blogger.com/img/blank.gifised psychiatric interview at 15 to assess any mental-health problems. 3% of the children perceived their parents as almost always emotionally neglectful and controlling and this group had more than twice the risk of developing mental-health problems at 15.

Young, Robert, Lennie, Susan and Minnis, Helen - Children’s perceptions of parental emotional

neglect and control and psychopathology Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
doi:10.1111/j.1469-7610.2011.02390.x

See Center for Family Development for information about Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy, an evidence-based, effective, and empirically validated treatment. Also see the Center's facebook page.

Mar 27, 2011

Theory of Mind and Attachment

Theory of Mind (ToM) can be defined as the ability to work out what other people are thinking and how this might affect their behavior. In most children ToM shows a significant advance between the ages of three and five. However, the development of ToM is severely delayed in children with autism. In addition, children who have experienced significant trauma and have disorders of attachment also show limited ToM. Several studies have shown that having brothers and sisters can improve children's ToM and researchers from the University of Queensland in Australia studied sixty children with autism to see if this was the case for them too. The researchers measured the children's ToM, executive functioning, verbal mental age and autism symptoms and compared this to the number of siblings the children had and where they fitted into the sequence. The researchers found that the children with older siblings actually had a weaker ToM, perhaps because their older brothers and sisters helped them to interpret other people's actions and stopped them from developing their own skills. Having younger siblings led to a weak improvement in ToM but this was not significant once mental age and autism symptoms were taken into account.

O'Brien, Karen, Slaughter, Virginia and Peterson, Candida C. - Sibling influences on theory of mind

development for children with ASD Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
doi:10.1111/j.1469-7610.2011.02389.x

Mar 20, 2011

Becoming a Certified DDP therapist

The workshop covers all the "Required Core Training Content" necessary to enter the practicum to become a Certified Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy therapist. The use of SKYPE will allow remote participants to fulfill the requirements to become Certified Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy therapists. Participants may register for the full 56 hours or for Part A or Part B alone.

The workshop uses a combination of SKYPE workshop sessions, group discussion, independent study, and case presentations.
Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy is an evidence-based, effective, and empirically validated treatment that is grounded in current thinking and research on the etiology and treatment of Complex Trauma or Developmental Trauma Disorder and disorders of attachment. Treatment is primarily experiential and there is an important teaching element as well. Teaching parents about attachment-facilitating parenting methods and the importance of attunement and responsive, sensitive parenting is essential. Direct work with the parents regarding their own family or origin issues is another component of treatment. Finally, intensive emotional work with the child in a manner consistent with sound treatment principles is vital.

The workshop is led by Dr. Arthur Becker-Weidman, who is a certified Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapist, Certified Consultant, and Certified Trainer by the Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy Institute.

SCHEDULE
Starting dates and SKYPE sessions scheduled based on your availability and convenience. Assignments independent study occur at your pace.

A. 28 hour First half
* Patterns of attachment
* Engaging and working with parents
* Intersubjectivity & use of self in practice
* Experiential components of training
* Components of Practice
* Phases of Treatment
B. 28 hour Second half
* Differential use of components of
* Practice in different phases of
treatment
* Treatment with different populations and
circumstances
* Experiential components of training
* Consultation
Sections A & B cover all the required core training content for training to meet the DDPI requirements to apply for the Practicum to become a certified DDP therapist. Therapists may make application after completing section A.

Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy is an evidence-based, effective, and empirically validated treatment. Two follow-up studies with control groups found clinically and statistically significant reductions in symptoms of attachment disorder, aggression, anti-social behavior, thought disorders, attention problems, mood, and social relationship dysfunction. Over 80% of the children treated had previously been in treatment on three or more occasions, without any noticeable improvement. Treatment averaged 23 sessions over approximately ten months. (Arthur Becker-Weidman, Ph.D., Child & Adolescent Social Work, vol. 23, pp.137-171, 2006)

SUGGESTED READING
You will find the following list of books helpful. It is strongly recommended that you read the first two books before the workshop begins. This will ensure that everyone has a solid foundation of common knowledge.

1. Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy: Essential Methods & Practices, Arthur Becker-Weidman, Ph.D., Rowman, Lanham, MD, 2010.
2. The Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy Casebook, Arthur Becker-Weidman, Rowman: Lanham, MD, 2011.
3. Creating Capacity for Attachment, Eds., Arthur Becker-Weidman, Ph.D., Deborah Shell, MA, LCMHC, Wood ‘N’ Barnes, 2005/2008.
4. Attachment Parenting, Ed., Arthur Becker-Weidman & Deborah Shell, Rowman: Lanham, MD, 2010.
5. Attachment-Focused Family Therapy. Daniel Hughes, Norton, 2007.
6. Attachment-Focused Family Therapy Workbook, Norton: NY, 2011.
7. Handbook of Attachment: Theory, Research, and Clinical Applications. Edited by Jude Cassidy and Phillip Shaver. The Guilford Press, 2008.
8. Building the Bonds of Attachment. 2nd. Ed. Daniel Hughes, Ph.D., 2006
9. Attachment Across the Life Cycle. Edited by Colin Murray Parkes, Joan Stevenson-Hinde, and Peter Marris. Routledge, 1991.
10. A Secure Base. John Bowlby, Basic Books, NY, 1988.
11. John Bowlby & Attachment Theory. Jeremy Holmes, Routledge, NY, 1993.

PURPOSE OF WORKSHOP
This workshop is for therapists who want to learn how to treat trauma-attachment disordered children. Participants will learn effective therapy principals for helping traumatized children. Participants will learn:
1. Initial work to determine parent readiness.
2. The components of Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy and the phases of treatment.
3. The differential use of components in different phases of treatment.
4. Effective therapeutic techniques to use with traumatized and attachment disordered children and their families.
5. Effective parenting principals.
Participants will have the opportunity to view videotapes of actual therapy sessions with traumatized children that demonstrate therapeutic principals and present their own video tapes or cases.


REGISTRATION
NAME:
ADDRESS:

Degree:
DAY PHONE #: ( )
E-MAIL:
AGENCY NAME (if applicable):

A.: B.: BOTH:______
Fee is $500 (US$) for Sections A or B and $950 for both. A refund, minus a $95 administrative fee, will be given for cancellations. No refunds will be issued beginning course. A $150 deposit is required and full payment is due by the time you being.
$500 or $950 (U.S. $) fee enclosed.
OR
$150 deposit enclosed, balance due before starting.
Purchase Orders: include $25 fee. Payment in full must be received prior to starting training.

Registration fee includes workshop information packet, and Certificate of Attendance for 28 or 56 CEU’s.

To register send application form and check to:
CENTER FOR FAMILY DEVELOPMENT
5820 Main Street, Suite 406
Williamsville, NY, 14221
Website: www.Center4FamilyDevelop.com
E-mail: Aweidman@Concentric.net
Phone: 716-810-0790 Fax: 716-636-6243

Jan 9, 2011

Can Empathy be taught?

Empathy is an essential ingredient for good parenting, good treatment, and good psychotherapy. Empathy allows one to see the world through the eyes of the other, walk in that person's shoes, share emotions, and build common experiences. Intersubjectivity, share emotions, share attention, and complimentary intentions form a core of empathy. It is these shared experiences (when concordant) that can help form the bedrock of stable, secure, safe, and positive relationships.

Many people are aware of "mirror neurons" as a neurological component of empathy. Mirror neurons are activated when one observes another's actions and the same motor neurons in the observers brain are activated as the ones in the "doers" brain that are necessary to carry out the action. Mirror neurons are activated in the emotional centers of the brain when we observe another and share affect.

While all this interesting and informative, it is not prescriptive. The question is, "is there some way to teach or enhance empathy?" Well, it turns out there are a number of ways. One of the easiest, simplest, and best ways is simply to listen and listen carefully. This is one way to get into another's head, so to speak.

Traditional views of the communication process held that speech and listening happened in two different parts of the brain: Broca's area and Wernicke's area. Yet studies show that communication partners unconsciously change their grammar structure, their speaking rate, and even their body postures to that of their partner. One could say that their communication changes show empathy for each other; some call this establishing a common ground. Studies by Dr. Hasson at Princeton University and graduate student Lauren Silbert demonstate this. The study involved having Ms. Silbert talk about emotionally meaningful events, tell stories from her life, while in a functional MRI. Then subjects were put into the f-MRI and listened to the recorded stories.

The most attentive listeners' key brain regions "lit up" in a f-MRI before her words came out. This suggests that the subjects anticipated what Ms. Silbert was going to say; empathy.

So helping parents, professionals, and therapists listen more carefully, more fully, and more deeply will increase their empathic capabilities. Listening is a skill that can be taught, improved on, and mastered.

For more information see:
Center For Family Development

Useful books & DVD's are:

Attachment Parenting

Principles of Attachment Parenting

Creating Capacity for Attachment

Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy: Essential Practices & Methods

Introduction to Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy